Your 12-13-14 Wedding Special

June 24th, 2014 by Susan

RingsOnly one special package is being offered for a wedding with just the two of you on the special date of 12-13-14 (for the numerically challenged that’s December 13, 2014). 

It has now been booked! However our normal wedding and elopement packages are available for other dates.

All of the following are included:

11:12:13 Wedding Special photo Portrait

  • An excellent Justice of the Peace who will officiate at your wedding ceremony and contact you ahead of time to work with you to personalize your ceremony
  • Digital photographs of your ceremony and a CD of your photos
  • A wedding cake
  • A bottle of sparkling wine or sparkling pear or apple juice
  • Seasonal flowers as bouquets or boutonnieres
  • Two signature West Hill House B&B coffee mugs
  • Two West Hill House B&B keepsake Champagne flutes
  • Two nights of accommodation in the Paris Suite
  • Two luxurious West Hill House B&B “Doe Skin” robes
  • One Ted E. Bear complete with matching robe
  • Dinner for two on Saturday at either excellent restaurant: The Common Man or 275 Main at the Pitcher Inn

This great package is offered for $1516.17 plus 9% tax. Call us at (802) 496-7162 to book.

The Small Print: This offer is only good for a wedding to be held at 1:00PM on December 13, 2014. No change of time or date will be considered. A $500 non-refundable, non-transferable deposit for this special wedding package is required at the time of booking. Note that the deposit does not entitle the couple to any of the offerings should the wedding be cancelled. 
 

Don’t Walk, Run to the 4th Annual Mad Marathon

June 20th, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

4th Annual Mad Marathon in Vermont's Mad River ValleyThe 4th annual Mad Marathon, Mad Half, and Relays are scheduled for July 6th, 2014 – and you’d be hard pressed to ask for a more breathtaking course than Vermont’s Mad River Valley – that’s why they call it “The World’s Most Beautiful Marathon!”

The Mad Marathon and associated events occur along rural Mad River Valley roads with stunning vistas of the Green Mountains, rolling farm land and fields dotted with cows, rustic barns, quiet villages, and, of course, Vermont’s historic covered bridges.

With three different events, runners have the opportunity to choose a race that suits their level of ability. The Mad Marathon course is 26.2 miles long and the Mad Half is, as the name suggests, half that at 13.1 miles long.

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Get Wrapped Up In the Vermont Quilt Festival

May 26th, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

Vermont Quilt Festival 2014The Vermont Quilt Festival, scheduled for June 27th through 29th at the Champlain Valley Exposition Center, is New England’s oldest and largest quilt event!

Quilting is a tradition that goes back far into our collective history. Who hasn’t snuggled up under a big, soft quilt on a cold, winter night – or at least wished they could! There’s something special about a handmade quilt – that family heirloom, that work of art – something that surpasses the depth of many other household objects whether you’re a quilter yourself or just a fan, and that’s what the 38th annual Vermont Quilt Festival is all about.

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BrewGrass Festival 2014

May 19th, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

BrewGrass Festival 2014Something’s brewing in them, thar hills – it’s the fourth annual Sugarbush BrewGrass Festival!

And what, exactly, is a BrewGrass Festival?

The BrewGrass Festival is an annual, Mad River Valley celebration that combines three of the better things in this life: blue grass music, craft-brewed, regional beer (also cider and distilled liquors), and a delectable selection of finger-licking foods: *that’s* BrewGrass Festival.

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Fresh from the Farm

May 6th, 2014 by Susan

If you live in or near a farming community you have doubtless heard of CSA, Community Supported Agriculture, which enables consumers to purchase local, seasonal produce direct from the farmer.Unknown

Farmers and consumers both benefit from the CSA scenario. Farmers have time to market their food before the start of their long days in the fields, they receive payment for their produce early in the season which helps with their cash flow, and they have the opportunity to meet the people who purchase the results of their labors.

Consumers benefit as well with absolutely fresh food full of vitamins and flavor, they learn about new foods and new recipes, they know where their food is coming from, and they develop a relationship with “their farmer(s)”.

Here in the Mad River Valley there are several CSA programs underway and we recently bought a “share” in Muddy Boots, a CSA collaborative effort between three organic farms, Kingsbury Market Garden, Wood’s Market Garden and Burnt Rock Farm. Other smaller producers will also be involved  so we will have the option of also receiving fresh bread, butter, sunflower oil, dry beans and a variety of other wonderful items.

Claytonia

Claytonia ready for harvest.

Aaron prepares his tractor,

Aaron prepares his tractor


Muddy Boots recently had an open house where we met one of “our farmers”, Aaron of Kingsbury Market Garden, who was getting his tractor ready for onion planting, and Marisa of Bragg Farm in Fayston, one of the smaller producers, who will be providing butter and cheese products.

Not only did we meet these two, we met a new-to-us food, Claytonia, which is quite delicate in appearance, tastes somewhat sweet, is full of vitamin C and will make a lovely addition to a salad of fresh greens.

This year at West Hill House B&B we will be incorporating items from our CSA share into our breakfasts so you, our guests, will be able to taste fresh, farm-to-tummy produce from our neighbors.

Canoeing and Kayaking Mad River Valley

April 28th, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

Kayaking Mad River Valley

As the weather continues to warm, the foliage begins to green, and the Winooski and Mad rivers begin to swell, thoughts turn to canoeing and kayaking Mad River Valley.

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Springtime in Vermont

April 16th, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

Springtime In Vermont - Blue Winged Teal

a Blue-Winged Teal shows off its colors

That shift in the weather, that smell of maple sugaring in the air can only mean one thing: Springtime in Vermont is here!

Ah, springtime in Vermont: runoff swells the creeks back to bubbling life, the trees fill with the activity of birds. Both year-round residents and migratory species can be seen winging their way back to – and through – our neck of the woods: the Scarlet Tanager, Bicknell’s Thrush, the Indigo Bunting, the Ruby-throated Hummingbird, the Common Yellowthroat, the Meadowlark, the Blue-winged Teal, and many, many more.

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Rosettes

March 31st, 2014 by Susan


new rosette photo
Stirring it up: Here’s an easy recipe for a simply delicious and delicate treat. While easy, this recipe should be undertaken when you have no other distractions as you will be cooking with very hot oil. You will need rosette irons and handle as pictured here with the completed rosettes. The recipe for the sandbakkkels (the three cookies scolloped cookies)  will be posted before long.

Ingredients:

  • 2 eggs at room temperature
  • 2 t. vanilla sugar or 2 t. white sugar plus 1 t. of an extract of choice
  • 1 c. milk
  • 1 c. all purpose flour
  • 1/4 t. salt
  • Canola oil

Whisk together the eggs, vanilla sugar and milk.

Sift together the flour and salt then whisk it into the egg mixture and whisk till smooth.

Attach an iron to the handle.

In a large, heavy pan heat 2 to 3 inches of Canola oil to between 360°F and 365°F. Keep a careful eye on the oil so that it does not get hotter during the cooking process.

CAREFULLY dip the iron into the hot oil.|

Remove the iron from the oil and dip it into the batter just deep enough to come up to the top edge of the sides of the iron. Do not cover the iron with  batter.

Now, submerge the iron into the hot oil just long enough to turn the rosette a light golden brown. If the rosette falls off the iron, use a chopstick or a long handled roasting fork to remove it from the oil.

Remove the iron from the oil and place the rosette on a paper towel to cool. If the rosette doesn’t come off the iron easily, use a kitchen knife to gently press it off.

If you wish to change the iron to another shape remember, the iron may be extremely hot so use a pot holder to cover the iron when unscrewing it from the handle.

Cool completely. Just before serving sprinkle with powdered sugar.

This recipe makes about 25 large rosettes.

Dishing it out: Called struva in Swedish, these delicate treats were not common in our family, maybe because there were four of us kids and Mom had little time to stand over a hot pan of oil without one or the other of us needing (or wanting!) her full attention. When she did make these, usually for a special occasion, she would always save one for each of us. A rosette covered with powdered sugar and a cup of  “tea” was about as special a tea-party as any child could wish for.

Enjoy!

Plan Your Perfect Outdoor Vermont Wedding Now!

March 31st, 2014 by Corey A. Edwards

Plan Your Perfect Outdoor Vermont Wedding Now!

There’s just about nowhere more perfect for an outdoor Vermont wedding than West Hill House B&B in the Mad River Valley – and now is the time to plan that summer wedding you’ve always dreamed of.

Whether you’re going for a big ceremony with all your friends and relatives, a more intimate ceremony, or just a simple elopement, we have the experience and facilities to help make your special day one that you will look back on with fondness for the rest of your lives.

Our all-season, Handsome Red Barn is the perfect venue for larger weddings, as it is newly renovated and can comfortably accommodate up to 50 people. We don’t overload ourselves with big events – only six a year – so we can devote the helpful kind of stress-free attention your wedding deserves.

With our extensive experience hosting weddings, we’re familiar with all the wedding professionals the Mad River Valley has to offer, so we can help coordinate the services that fit your needs: catering, music, photography, cake, Justice of the Peace, and more. No detail is too small.

West Hill House B&B is ready to accommodate your rehearsals, receptions, and dinners, too. We offer on-site catering and we’re even state licensed for the sale of beer and wine!

Prefer elopement to a big ceremony? We have a number of elopement plans to suit whatever size ceremony you’re planning: whether it’s just the two of you or up to 16 guests.

We’re the perfect location for your Vermont Honeymoon, too – whether you get married here or not! West Hill House B&B’s location on a quiet country lane in the heart of Vermont’s lush Green Mountains is the epitome of intimacy and relaxation. Settle into one of our unique guest rooms with its incredibly comfortable bed, warm and soothing double Jacuzzi tub, pampering hosts, and only minutes away from a wide array of year-round activities.

With the amenities at West Hill House B&B and the natural beauty of the Mad River Valley, your perfect, outdoor Vermont wedding is but a reservation away. Don’t let the opportunity to hold your ceremony at our popular wedding venue slip away: book now.

Chinese Chews

March 23rd, 2014 by Susan

Stirring it up!

These bars are quick and easy to make, perfect when you need a little something to go along with an afternoon cuppa. Dates add a special sweetness and walnuts give a nice crunch to each bite. This recipe does not call for any butter or shortening.

Ingredients:

tempting Chinese Chews.

Tempting Chinese Chews.

  • 2/3 c. all purpose flour
  • 1 t. baking powder
  • 1/4 t. salt
  • 3/4 c. sugar, white
  • 1 c. dates,  pitted and chopped
  • 1 c. walnuts, chopped
  • 2 eggs, well-beaten
  • 1/2 t. vanilla
  • confectioners sugar

Stir the flour, baking powder and salt together.

Add sugar, dates and nuts, then stir in the eggs and vanilla.

Spread about 1/2″ thick in a well greased or parchment lined 9″ x 9″ square pan.

Bake at 325°F  for 25 to 30 minutes.

Cut into small squares while still warm and dust with confectioners sugar.

Dishing it out:

Apparently this recipe was first published in Good Housekeeping magazine in 1917 but by all accounts, why the name Chinese Chews, remains a mystery. While this recipe may not be the same as the early version, my mom made these from a recipe in her trusty Five Roses Flour cookbook,  A Guide to Good Cooking. My copy of the same cookbook is filled with annotated recipes on well worn pages, several of which are held in the book with tape.  The recipe actually called for the squares, once cool enough to handle, to be rolled into balls then dusted with sugar. I never remember having them rolled but no matter the shape, the taste is great and they are chewy! One drawback though, they are so good they won’t last long!

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